Berkhamsted Castle

BerkhamstAFD_Flag21_Dayed Castle was one of the most important early Norman castles. Situated just 30 miles north of London, it provided protection from any forces approaching from the north of England.

It is probably most famous for being the location of the English submission to William the Conqueror after the Battle of Hastings. William’s half-brother, Robert of Mortain built a timber motte-and-bailey castle here just a few years later. The conical mound that survives today was the motte, on top of which there would have been a wooden building (keep). Beneath this was the bailey, a

Reproduction of a postcard showing a drawing of Berkhamsted Castle by Charles Ashdown. The drawing shows what the castle looked like at the time of King Edward IV. Postcard from the Vivien Bryant Potten End Collection (DACHT : 432.56.6.03b)

Reproduction of a postcard showing a drawing of Berkhamsted Castle by Charles Ashdown. The drawing shows what the castle looked like at the time of King Edward IV. Postcard from the Vivien Bryant Potten End Collection (DACHT : 432.56.6.03b)

timber walled open space. Both the motte and bailey were surrounded by a defensive water-filled ditch which is still visible at the site.

When Thomas Becket, King Henry II’s right hand man, was granted the land in 1155 he rebuilt the castle including the large stone wall, the remains of which still stand. Almost 10 years later the castle was taken away from Becket after he was accused of embezzling (stealing) money from the King.

Berkhamsted castle did not face much military activity and was for the most part an impressive home for Royal residents, however in 1216 the castle was besieged for two weeks by Prince Louis of France. Having been battered with huge stones from siege weapons the 9-year-old, King Henry III surrendered the castle.

Why not visit the castle grounds and see the castle remains for yourself? Find out how more information and how to visit here.

Looking for some Castle related acitvities?

Build a castle from cardboard boxes, decorate it with style fit for royalty and defend it from Prince Louis’ forces. Here is some inpiration but share your own with us on facebook and instagram #dacorumheritage #armedforcesday

If all your spare cardboard has been recycled try building a lego castle, or make a fort with sheets and pillows and defend your royal home from invaders

This is a sturdy cardboard castle. What does yours look like?

This is a sturdy cardboard castle. What does yours look like?

Download this colouring in sheet depicting Berkhamsted Castle. You might want to draw some soldiers defending the keep, or some attacking forces hurling stones at the walls. Or perhaps you want to draw a more peaceful scene with a market in the courtyard.

Make your own catapult using a wooden spoon tied to an empty toilet roll holder. Experiment with different size spoons to see which one can catapult some screwed up paper the furthest distance.

A DIY catapult

A DIY catapult

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The Dacorum Heritage Trust Ltd.

The Museum Store, Clarence Road, Berkhamsted, Herts HP4 3YL

Telephone/Fax 01442 879525   Email info@dacorumheritage.org.uk

Registered in England No. 2851313 | Registered Charity No. 1026161 | Accredited Museum No. 1594 | Status: Fully accredited museum.